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  • Family carers' group calls for more recognition of care home role

    Family carers' group calls for more recognition of care home role

    02.09.20 Alzheimer Scotland’s National Dementia Carers Action Network (NDCAN) has called for greater recognition for the role of family carers in supporting their relatives in care homes. The lobby group said their role had been neglected despite the stress of lockdown, which appeared to have accelerated the decline in care home residents’ health. “We are a vital part of the system, but our contribution seems very low on the priority list currently and the role we can play in caring for our loved ones needs to be recognised,” NDCAN said. “Our wellbeing is also affected by being excluded from their lives. We have cared for these people 24/7 and know their needs so well – we can be their voice and are part of their history and what makes them who they are.” NDCAN member Janette Kean told the Sunday Post: “We have been excluded from their homes with no consultation and we know that many people with dementia have given up as a result.”

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  • NCF insists that CQC inspectors should be tested

    NCF insists that CQC inspectors should be tested

    01.09.20 Not-for-profit care home organisation the National Care Forum (NCF) has urged the government to reverse a decision to allow inspectors into homes without undergoing a coronavirus test beforehand. In an open letter to health secretary Matt Hancock, NCF said the policy of excluding Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors from weekly testing prior to care home visits was an “extraordinary decision”. It added that inspectors typically spent several hours on-site, moved between different groups of residents and staff, and potentially visited multiple homes. “We welcome scrutiny and oversight by the regulator and we all want the CQC to be able to regulate effectively,” said NCF chief executive Vic Rayner. “However, this must include routine regular testing for those inspectors tasked with conducting on-site inspection visits to care settings.”

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  • Major dip in Alzheimer's research

    Major dip in Alzheimer's research

    28.08.20 Data collected by the medical research platform MediFind suggests that Alzheimer’s research has dropped by 26% as research funders have concentrated resources on coronavirus. MediFind said that the shift in focus had caused other diseases to become an “afterthought” and that it would be likely to have an impact on public health for years to come. “Medical research is a cumulative process and, typically, there’s a significant time lag between most research and improvements in patient outcomes,” MediFind said. “Consequently, the diversion of resources to Covid-19 will almost certainly lead to a long-term slowdown in advances for these conditions.”

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  • E-Newsletter - 28 Aug 2020

    E-Newsletter - 28 Aug 2020

    Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include My Home Life tips on self care for managers, a National Care Forum request for Covid-19 testing of CQC inspectors, and a chance to join the NAPA choir. It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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  • E-Newsletter - 21 August 2020

    E-Newsletter - 21 August 2020

    .Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include a new digital project launched by the National Care Forum and a Yorkshire care home group sounding alarm over the cost of insurance cover during the pandemic. It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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  • Digital project to assist care providers with tech innovation

    Digital project to assist care providers with tech innovation

    28.08.20 A digital project launched by the National Care Forum (NCF) will help care providers understand the benefits of technology, how to build a business case for investment and how to successfully introduce, use and evaluate technology. The Hubble Project, for which NCF has received funding from NHS Digital’s Digital Pathfinders Programme, will allow virtual visits to digital “innovation hubs”, so that care providers can learn from other care providers who have made innovative use of the technology. “These are warts-and-all sessions, where care providers will share the lessons they have learned,” said NCF chief executive Vic Rayner. “Our virtual visitors will also have access to a wide range of resources after the visits, including a toolkit to support building a business case, getting buy-in, and implementation. And the tech suppliers featured during the sessions are also offering participants a time-limited reduction on the cost of their technology.”

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  • People with dementia prioritise staying connected and keeping active

    People with dementia prioritise staying connected and keeping active

    27.08.20 A Norwegian study, in which 35 people with dementia were interviewed about their needs in order to facilitate their involvement in services, finds that their three greatest needs were to stay connected, be active and participate, and to live for the moment. The study, reported in BMJ Open, also identifies an overarching theme: “the need to be who I am”. The authors conclude: “People with dementia participating in the study were heterogeneous regarding wants and requirements. Most of them expressed the need and wish to hold on to who they are. Close and robust relations with family and friends can give significant support to people with dementia. However, living with dementia might put considerable strain on relations. Services should provide support to enhance relationships, encourage existing networks to remain stable and facilitate participation in meaningful activities." Link here

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  • Research to provide evidence for home care

    Research to provide evidence for home care

    26.08.20 A three-year research project looking at home care for people with dementia, among other things, has been launched in a partnership between Home Instead Senior Care and the University of York. The programme, which is seeking a research fellow to lead it, will work with Home Instead home care teams across the UK to amass an evidence base for what works in the provision of person-centred care. “Particularly in a post-pandemic world we have seen the vitally important role that being cared for in your own home environment can make in the quality of care provided to our vulnerable seniors,” said Mark Laing, Home Instead’s director of innovation. “The three-year research partnership will provide the social care sector with an evidence-based view of home care, helping to shape what home care looks like in the future."

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  • Risk of 'abuse and fraud' as we move toward cashless society

    Risk of 'abuse and fraud' as we move toward cashless society

    25.08.20 International Longevity Centre UK director David Sinclair writes in a blog on the subject of dementia and personal finance, claiming that “unless we act quickly the changes in the way we manage money, from the ‘end of cash’ to post office and bank closures, risk the financial wellbeing of people with dementia.” He says that coronavirus will only accelerate the process, raising problems with access to cash and managing electronic payments, abuse and fraud, problems with money management and overspending or underspending. “People living with dementia are particularly likely to need protection and support when faced with unscrupulous business practices from ‘sharp’ or aggressive selling to consumer fraud,” Sinclair writes.
    Link here

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  • Coronavirus continues to impact on dementia charities

    Coronavirus continues to impact on dementia charities

    24.08.20 Life Changes Trust has become one of the latest charities involved with dementia to have suffered from the adverse effects of coronavirus. According to Third Force News, the Scottish charity will close a year early due to the pandemic. It was already understood that other impacts from the pandemic could include up to 300 redundancies at Alzheimer’s Society, which has predicted lost income of £45 miliion, and an unspecified number of redundancies at Age UK. Life Changes Trust, set up in 2013 with funding from the National Lottery Community Fund, supports people with dementia, unpaid carers and young people with care experience. It was due to run until 2023 but will now wind up operations in March 2022 to make savings in some areas and increase funding to its beneficiaries in the meantime.

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