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  • Don't be fobbed off by wishful thinking, says Jeremy Hughes

    Don't be fobbed off by wishful thinking, says Jeremy Hughes

    11.11.19 Alzheimer’s Society chief executive Jeremy Hughes told a packed UKDC plenary session not to be “fobbed off” by the next government through any wishful thinking about dementia care after the general election. “My message to go out loud and clear from this conference today is that we need all political parties to commit to ending the injustice for people with dementia,” he said. “It’s not just about funding, we need investment to improve the quality of dementia care. Two out of five home care workers don’t just have inadequate dementia training, they have none. That is a scandal and it shouldn’t be allowed – it should be illegal.”

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  • E-Newsletter - 8 Nov 2019

    E-Newsletter - 8 Nov 2019

    Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include reports from UKDC, a Value of Swimming report and a global funding scheme promoting brain health. It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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  • Sheffield 'Remember When Cafe' scoops local business award

    Sheffield 'Remember When Cafe' scoops local business award

    4.11.19 Sheffield’s Remember When Café has scooped a top local award for its special welcome to people with dementia. The café, awarded first prize for Age Friendly Sheffield Business, was described by the awards organisers as “a lovely place that caters well for everyone but is especially welcoming to older people and people with dementia”. The organisers, Age Better Sheffield, Lai Yin Association and Age UK Sheffield, praised the café for its regular singing sessions led by a paid singer. Members of the public were asked to nominate businesses for the award, one of whom said of Remember When: “Every time I visit with my mother who has Alzheimer’s, she is made to feel welcome, treated as an individual and treated with dignity and respect”.

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  • World Dementia Council told dementia threat is same as HIV/AIDS

    World Dementia Council told dementia threat is same as HIV/AIDS

    01.11.19 Dementia is an under-funded and overlooked area of medicine just like HIV/AIDS in the early days, the Dutch health minister has told a meeting of the World Dementia Council in Japan. Speaking on behalf of the Dutch government Hugo de Jonge said dementia posed a similar threat to global health and that the same sense of urgency was needed in medical research. “Only when it became clear how quickly the epidemic of HIV/AIDS was taking hold... taking millions of lives around the globe, did a global awareness emerge,” de Jonge was quoted in the Guardian as saying.
    De Jonge said that nearly 75 million people worldwide would have dementia by 2030, when the cost of care would be £1.6 trillion annually. “No one should be in any doubt: dementia is one of the biggest medical and social challenges we’ll face in the years ahead. In some countries, it already is the main cause of death.”

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  • Alzheimer Scotland says football study findings are 'conclusive'

    Alzheimer Scotland says football study findings are 'conclusive'

    31.10.19 Alzheimer Scotland described the Glasgow University finding that footballers had an elevated risk of neurodegenerative disease (see above) as “conclusive evidence” that there is a definitive link between the professional game and a higher incidence of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases. “This was an exceptionally robust study and given the scale of the findings there must now be no time lost in moving forward further research to properly define what the main risk factors are and indeed determining what must be done to minimise them,” said the charity’s chief executive Henry Simmons.

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  • Research reveals complex care needs in dual diagnosis patients

    Research reveals complex care needs in dual diagnosis patients

    30.10.19 A 15-month study by researchers at Leeds Beckett University has found that 7.5% of people aged 75-plus with cancer also have a dementia diagnosis. Calling for cancer care staff to be trained to support people with dementia, the university’s Centre for Dementia Research looked at records from 391 GP practices and found that people with both conditions had more complex care needs. They were more likely to have other co-morbidities and to be living in a care home than people with cancer alone. Decisions about cancer treatment added another layer of complexity, the study found, as there could be challenges around mental capacity and determining what was in the person’s best interests.

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  • Major study provides evidence linking football to dementia

    Major study provides evidence linking football to dementia

    29.10.19 Long-standing claims that heading the ball in professional football can cause dementia have been backed by the first major study into the claims, which found that former professional footballers were five times more likely than expected to have died from Alzheimer’s disease. When researchers who carried out the Glasgow University FIELD study looked at neurodegenerative diseases overall, they found that footballers were three-and-a-half times more likely than the general population to have died from one of them. Published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine, the study compared the causes of death of 7,676 former footballers against those of more than 23,000 matched individuals from the general population.

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  • Social prescribing academy given £5m funding

    Social prescribing academy given £5m funding

    28.10.19 Health secretary Matt Hancock has elaborated on plans for a National Academy for Social Prescribing, first announced earlier this year, with a pledge of £5 million in government funding. The academy, which will be led by outgoing Royal College of GPs chair Professor Helen Stokes-Lampard, is intended to help achieve the government’s ambition that everyone will have access to social prescribing on the NHS as readily as they do medical care. It is based on the idea that GPs will be able to “prescribe” community activities like art and singing classes in the same way as they prescribe medicines. According to the Department of Health and Social Care, 60% of clinical commissioning groups already use social prescribing for patients with dementia, anxiety or mental health problems, but the government wants the rest to do likewise.

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  • Surprise findings could lead to 'first new treatment in over 15 years'

    Surprise findings could lead to 'first new treatment in over 15 years'

    25.10.19 A major pharmaceutical company is seeking regulatory approval for a drug to delay cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s disease, following an unexpected turn-around in results from a trial of the drug. After announcing in the spring that “aducanumab” had failed to produce statistically significant benefits, US company Biogen said this week that further analysis of a larger dataset had shown that the drug was in fact clinically effective in patients with early Alzheimer’s disease. Dr James Pickett, head of research at Alzheimer’s Society, described it as “hugely exciting news,” adding: “We’re waiting for further data but this could be the first new treatment for Alzheimer’s disease in over 15 years and, as such, has the potential to be a transformative discovery.”

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  • E-Newsletter 25.10.19

    E-Newsletter 25.10.19

    Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include new research on complex care needs in dual diagnosis patients, plans for a social prescribing academy and a potential new treatment to delay cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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