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  • Speedy action needed in Northern Ireland on growing dementia impact

    Speedy action needed in Northern Ireland on growing dementia impact

    11.02.20 Northern Ireland’s newly re-established Assembly and executive must act quickly as the region faces the fastest projected increase in people living with dementia across the UK, Alzheimer’s Society has said. There are now 22,000 people with dementia in Northern Ireland, but the number is projected to double by 2040. In an open letter Bernadine McCrory. Northern Ireland director for Alzheimer’s Society, told health minister Robin Swann that concerted government action was needed to tackle dementia and the social and economic cost. McCrory called on the minister to “radically reform social care funding to address the costs faced by the growing number of people with dementia.

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  • E-Newsletter - 7 Feb 2002

    E-Newsletter - 7 Feb 2002

    Here is the week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include the NICE report on use of antipsychotics and the debate on "hidden" disability lanyards. It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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  • Over 25,000 people with dementia sectioned in 5 years

    Over 25,000 people with dementia sectioned in 5 years

    10.02.20 Freedom of Information Act responses from 76 hospitals and councils across England have revealed that over 25,000 people with dementia have been sectioned over the last five years, with 95 sent more than 50 miles away from their families. The Telegraph reports that more than a thousand of these have been locked in hospital wards without specialist support. Experts have said that the figures were "deeply shocking" and warned that health workers may be misusing the Mental Health Act to section people inappropriately. For the full article, see HERE .

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  • Billy McNeill fund set up to help former footballers with dementia

    Billy McNeill fund set up to help former footballers with dementia

    07.02.20 Financial aid and therapeutic support for ex-footballers with dementia will come from the newly established Billy McNeill Fund, due to be launched in Glasgow on May 29. McNeill, who used to play for Celtic, died last April from Alzheimer’s after nine years living with the disease. His daughter Susan described the fund as “fabulous, a great legacy for dad,” and said it would mean “we can do whatever we can” for footballers in future. “In dad’s day, he was playing with a big heavy leather ball which would get soaking wet and would become extremely hard,” she said. “We know that in training they practised with the same ball so we do feel that there is a link between (his condition and) his playing days,” she told the BBC.

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  • Just one minute of exercise a week 'benefits older people'

    Just one minute of exercise a week 'benefits older people'

    06.02.20 Just one minute of exercise each week has distinct health benefits for older people, a study by Abertay University in Dundee has found. Groups of 65-to-75 year olds took part in once or twice weekly training sessions over eight weeks, showing improvements in blood glucose control and general mobility. All participants had led a sedentary lifestyle and were asked to pedal stationary bikes as hard as they could in brief bursts adding up to a minute, a procedure known as sprint interval training. Dr John Babraj, who led the study, said: “While those participating in the twice-weekly sessions observed a greater improvement, those taking part in the single session also observed change. Importantly, they also observed a difference in general function, greatly improving their ability to do everyday tasks such as getting up to answer a door and walk up and down stairs."

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  • CQC Connect podcasts reflect on challenges

    CQC Connect podcasts reflect on challenges

    05.02.20 The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has produced a new series of podcasts called CQC Connect in which it talks about aspects of its work. In episode one the CQC reviews what it has done to collect people’s experiences of care through the development of its “Give Feedback on Care” service, while episodes two and three reflect on the CQC’s recent State of Care report, the challenges facing health and social care, and its work to support innovation in the sector. The fourth episode, on outstanding general practice, came out on February 3 via podcast providers https://linktr.ee/cqcconnect

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  • Growing concern about future of overseas recruitment

    Growing concern about future of overseas recruitment

    04.02.20 There is mounting concern about the future of social care recruitment following a report from the Migration Advisory Committee (MAC), an official body advising government, recommending that overseas workers should only be recruited to posts offering salaries of £25,600 or more. While it is lower than the £30,000 threshold previously advocated by the government following Brexit, critics argue that it is still too high for bringing foreign workers into social care. Simon Bottery, senior fellow at the King’s Fund think tank, said: “By prioritising higher-paid workers, the MAC recommendations for a points-based visa system would effectively shut the door to thousands of people who are desperately needed to shore up the social care workforce.”

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  • E-Newsletter - 31 Jan 2020

    E-Newsletter - 31 Jan 2020

    Here is the week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include concerns about overseas recruitment, the benefits of exercise for older people and a new fund to help former footballers with dementia. It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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  • Active Minds launches smartphone app for activity coordinators

    Active Minds launches smartphone app for activity coordinators

    31.01.20 Activity products company Active Minds has launched a smartphone app designed to help activity coordinators find suitable activities for people with dementia in care homes. The “Support for Care” app tailors its activity recommendations to the abilities, needs and preferences of the person and includes a reporting feature so that activity coordinators can produce daily reports on how individual residents responded to particular activities. According to a report in Building Better Healthcare (BBH), the app was developed over 18 months and tested in care homes. It recommends creative activities for each resident based on a series of questions.

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  • North-west community hub is first to win gold standard award

    North-west community hub is first to win gold standard award

    30.01.20 A community health and wellbeing hub in the north-west of England has become the first public building to be awarded Stirling University’s “gold” dementia-friendly standard. The refurbished Great Sankey Neighbourhood Hub in Warrington opened its doors two years ago, having been redesigned to meet dementia-friendly standards and create a safe and welcoming environment for people living with the condition. Dr Martin Quirke, from Stirling’s Dementia Services Development Centre which gave the gold award, said the hub provided “a ground-breaking example of how public organisations, businesses, and the construction industry can, through the design of public buildings and the services they contain, make meaningful contributions to maintaining and improving public health and social inclusion within our communities – including the increasing number of people living with dementia.”

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