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  • Progress report on Dementia 2020 Challenge criticises GP role

    Progress report on Dementia 2020 Challenge criticises GP role

    04.03.19 Launching a progress review on the government’s Dementia 2020 Challenge, care minister Caroline Dinenage called this week for a stronger focus on young onset dementia and more participation in research by all people with the condition. The progress review also raised questions about GPs’ coordinating role in relation to dementia and whether they needed additional training to improve care for young people with dementia. The progress review can be found HERE

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  • What works in dementia education and training?

    What works in dementia education and training?

    How can training in dementia care best be delivered to health and social care staff? Claire Surr and colleagues report on the findings of a major study that set out to discover what works in providing dementia education for the workforce

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  • Communication: the Bouncing Balls workshop

    Communication: the Bouncing Balls workshop

    How do you show care home staff the impact of communication difficulties on people with dementia? Helen Moores-Poole says the “Bouncing Balls” workshop is a simple and powerful way to convey the message

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  • Practical and adaptable dementia-friendly design

    Practical and adaptable dementia-friendly design

    When it was rated “requires improvement” by the CQC, Quarry House care home decided on a design overhaul. Geoff Crocker and Peter Kevern describe the process

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  • Findings show mental and physical exercise reduce dementia risk

    Findings show mental and physical exercise reduce dementia risk

    01.03.19 Findings published in the journal Neurology (20 February) indicate that women who exercise and stay cognitively active in midlife reduce their risk of dementia in older age. Swedish researchers studied 800 women between the ages of 38 and 54, measuring time spent doing cognitively stimulating activities (eg reading and writing) and physical activities like walking and swimming. Dr Rosa Sancho, head of research at Alzheimer’s Research UK, said: “This research is more evidence that physical, mental and social activity all play a role in cognitive health. Midlife is increasingly seen as a key time when it comes to reducing dementia risk. However, keeping physically and mentally active can hold benefits for people of any age, so it is never too early or too late to adopt a lifestyle that supports a healthy brain.”

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  • First dedicated young dementia coordinator slams 'fragmented services'

    First dedicated young dementia coordinator slams 'fragmented services'

    28.02.19 The UK’s first dedicated clinical coordinator for patients with young onset brain disorders has hit out at services for this group which she says either do not exist or are fragmented. Fiona Chaabane, who is a nurse leader and has been appointed to the position at Southampton General Hospital, told the Daily Echo newspaper that young people with dementia are “falling on deaf ears” with little if any access to specialist support. She said it was having a “devastating” impact on their families. “Diagnosis of dementia in younger people is a challenge in itself since symptoms are often initially attributed to stress or depression,” she told the paper. “But once a diagnosis has been made, the services that these patients require either do not exist or are fragmented.”

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  • CQC launches campaign after millions fail to raise care concerns

    CQC launches campaign after millions fail to raise care concerns

    27.02.19 A “Declare Your Care” campaign has been launched by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) following research indicating that almost seven million people have had concerns about their care but never raised them. All had accessed health or social care in the past five years and more than half of them (58%) expressed regret that they had not raised their concerns. The campaign encourages people to share their experiences of care with the CQC, supporting its work to improve standards. Among the reasons for not wanting to raise any concerns were not knowing how (20%) and not wanting to be seen as a “troublemaker” (33%). More than a third (37%) thought that nothing would change if they did say anything, but two-thirds found that when they did speak out the issue was resolved quickly.

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  • Latest issue of the Journal of Dementia Care ...

    Latest issue of the Journal of Dementia Care ...

    26.02.19 End of life care and the care and treatment of people with advanced dementia are high on the news agenda in the latest JDC, out now. We report on Scotland’s Fair Dementia Care Commission, which asks why people with dementia are routinely denied access to free health care as they reach the advanced stages of the condition. It ties in with questions raised in our analysis of the NHS long-term plan for England – will it make much difference to dementia care or will it merely paper over the cracks in the absence of a funding solution for social care? In addition, our excellent cast of contributors address a diverse range of subjects, from effective dementia care training, activity provision in care homes and dementia-friendly interior design, to person-centred strategies for behaviours that challenge and practical approaches to recognising delirium in hospital settings. Plus, we report on research into the rarer dementias. All in the latest issue!

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  • Controversial liberty safeguards a step closer to becoming law

    Controversial liberty safeguards a step closer to becoming law

    25.02.19 Plans to replace the Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) with a new system have been approved by the House of Commons after a stormy series of debates. Labour MP and shadow care minister Barbara Keeley told the Commons that it was “appalling” there had been less than two hours in the final debate to discuss the new arrangements, which are part of the Mental Capacity (Amendment) Bill. Keeley said the Bill was “not fit for purpose” and replaced the current flawed system with one that was even more flawed. She said: “… the Bill creates a major conflict of interest in relation to the managers of private care homes. It is simply wrong that a business with a financial stake in seeing a deprivation of liberty authorisation granted can do all the legwork and then just have its recommendation rubber-stamped by the local council.”

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  • E-Newsletter 22.02.19

    E-Newsletter 22.02.19

    I am delighted to bring you my week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include the controversial liberty safeguards, a new CQC campaign after millions fail to raise care concerns, and the first dedicated young dementia co-ordinator. It is an editor's selection which I hope you will enjoy.

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