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  • GMB analysis finds more zero hours contracts in private care sector

    GMB analysis finds more zero hours contracts in private care sector

    01.05.19 An analysis by the GMB union suggests that care workers in the private sector are three times more likely to be on a zero hours contract than their counterparts in the public sector. Among the union’s other findings were that private sector care workers earn 17% less than those in the public sector and 40% leave their jobs every year. More than half of care workers in the private sector have no relevant social care qualifications, compared with less than 20% in the public sector, the GMB said. “These sobering statistics show a lack of funding in the care sector is putting the profession – and all of our futures – in serious danger,” said GMB national secretary Rehana Azam. “Recruiting and retaining quality staff to tight budgets is one of the most challenging issues providers are facing. We need action – GMB is now calling for special status for our EU care workers so we can continue to care for vulnerable people regardless of what happens with Brexit.”

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  • Labour would commit £2.8bn to end dementia 'injustice'

    Labour would commit £2.8bn to end dementia 'injustice'

    30.04.19 Labour would spend an extra £2.8 billion on home care packages if it formed the next government, the party said this week, ending what it described as an “injustice” to people with dementia. Barbara Keeley, shadow minister for mental health, said the initiative would reverse Conservative cuts which have seen numbers of people getting local authority-funded care plummeting by 104,000 since 2015. "This Tory government has shamefully abandoned older people and young adults with care needs,” Keeley said. "There is still no sign of their social care Green Paper which was promised over two years ago, and vulnerable older people have needlessly suffered as a result of the government's failure. People with dementia are unfairly punished when it comes to paying for their care needs so Labour will correct this injustice in government. We want care staff to be properly paid and trained, so that they can provide the kind of compassionate care that they want to give."

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  • New issue of the Journal of Dementia Care

    New issue of the Journal of Dementia Care

    29.04.2019 New technology leads the way in the latest issue of the Journal of Dementia Care (May/June), out in the next few days, which says it’s “high time that its potential to help people live as well as possible with dementia is fully exploited.” In the issue, Dr Thomas Sawyer considers how technology could improve diagnosis rates and early detection of dementia, while people living with dementia talk about how the “Alexa” virtual assistant is helping them to manage their everyday lives independently. In addition, we look in depth at issues such as keyworkers for people with young onset dementia, hospital care environments, and good practice in the care of LGBT+ people with dementia. We publish extracts from Keith Oliver’s new book “Dear Alzheimer’s” and consider what impending changes to the deprivation of liberty safeguards portend. PLUS news, views, resources and more!

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  • Tech transformation is the way forward for NHS

    Tech transformation is the way forward for NHS

    29.04.19 Health secretary Matt Hancock has renewed calls for the adoption of health and care technology in a foreword to a new report urging the widespread use of robots and artificial intelligence (AI). According to the report from the Taxpayers Alliance, a tenth of the NHS budget could be saved by automating aspects of the health service in this way. “Tech transformation in the NHS directly unlocks or frees resources for just about every other improvement we want to see, from using data to help boost cancer survival rates to joining up health and care to giving clinicians back the precious gift of time,” Hancock writes. “Longer-term, it’s the only way we’re going to bridge the gap between finite resources and the growing demand of an ageing population.”

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  • E-Newsletter 26 April 2019

    E-Newsletter 26 April 2019

    Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include older people's oral health, care workers in the private sector and a mobile game that detects people at risk of Alzheimer's disease. It is an editor's selection which I hope you will enjoy.

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  • E-Newsletter 19 April 2019

    E-Newsletter 19 April 2019

    Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include a flagship technology research centre, the world's largest survey on dementia and new HEE dementia workforce e-learning programme session. It is an editor's selection which I hope you will enjoy.

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  • HEE dementia workforce e-learning programme offers new sessions

    HEE dementia workforce e-learning programme offers new sessions

    26.04.19 Health Education England (HEE) has updated its e-learning programme for the dementia care workforce with 14 new training sessions replacing 12 sessions which have been discarded. HEE, which has worked with the University of Bradford on the new content, says that it focuses on the essential knowledge and skills needed to support and enable people with dementia and their family carers to live as well as possible in any setting. The new sessions are part of HEE’s e-Learning for Healthcare programme and cover issues like person-centred care, risk reduction and prevention, communication, end of life care, and living well with dementia and promoting independence. For more information, click HERE

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  • Up to 20 Meeting Centres expected to open

    Up to 20 Meeting Centres expected to open

    25.04.19 Between 15 and 20 new Meeting Centres are expected to open across the UK as part a new dementia support programme run by the University of Worcester Association for Dementia Studies (ADS). In the first newsletter for the Meeting Centres Support Programme, which was awarded nearly £600,000 from the Big Lottery Fund, ADS director Professor Dawn Brooker said she aimed to have up to 20 Meeting Centres either open or under development by the end of the three-year project. UK Meeting Centres, local resources based on a Dutch model offering expert support to people living with dementia at home, were trialled in Droitwich Spa and Leominster, since when a further six have been established in Ross-on-Wye, Lutterworth, Northampton, Brecon, Llandrindod Wells and Ystradgynlais while the first Scottish centre in Kirriemuir is just about to open.

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  • Documentary highlights plight of LGBT+ people as they get older

    Documentary highlights plight of LGBT+ people as they get older

    24.04.19 LGBT+ people are hiding their sexual or gender identity in care homes because they are afraid of bullying and discrimination. It is the basis of a new documentary film by Glenda Rome, “Return to the Closet?”, which is being premiered in Glasgow on 1 May, as part of the Luminate festival for older citizens. The film-maker told the Scotsman newspaper that extensive interviews for the film uncovered examples of older people in care homes “de-gaying” because they feared revealing their true identities and many care homes reported that they had no LGBT+ residents. “The idea of older people feeling they have to ‘go back into the closet’ is terrible,” Rome is quoted as saying. “It’s something people are just starting to think about now and the last thing we need is for the progress that has been made, which was hard-won for a generation who lived through the criminalisation of their sexuality, to be undermined.”

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  • Take part in 'world's largest survey' on dementia

    Take part in 'world's largest survey' on dementia

    23.04.19 Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) has asked the LSE to carry out what is billed as the “world’s largest survey” of people’s attitudes to dementia, with the results due in time to be published in the World Alzheimer Report later this year. ADI says the survey, which will be worldwide and is available in multiple languages, takes about 10 minutes to complete. It is aimed at four groups: health and care professionals, people living with dementia, carers of people with dementia, and the general public. The survey, which will be live on ADI’s website until 15 June, is intended to inform improvement of services. Dr Sara Evans-Lacko from the LSE said: “[Dementia] is a global issue with considerable public health significance...With this survey we are seeking to establish an understanding of current attitudes about dementia and gather data on first hand experiences of people living with dementia and their carers around the world."

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