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  • ADI issues call for papers ahead of Singapore conference

    ADI issues call for papers ahead of Singapore conference

    12.07.19 Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) has issued a call for abstract submissions for its 34th International Conference, to be held in Singapore on 19-21 March 2020. Around 1,000 delegates from ADI’s 100 member associations around the globe are expected to gather in Singapore and abstracts putting forward discussion topics for the conference should be themed around the World Health Organisation’s global action plan on dementia. “The Singapore 2020 conference is a wonderful opportunity for researchers, scientists, health care professionals, academics, innovators and entrepreneurs and people living with dementia and carers to submit abstracts based on their work and experience,” said ADI CEO Paola Barbarino. “We will be showcasing leading research, innovation and development – the global response to one of the most pressing health and care challenges of the decade.”

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  • Company says longer home care visits would improve quality

    Company says longer home care visits would improve quality

    11.07.19 Care technology firm Access Group has urged the people who commission home care services to increase the average length of home visits as the key to improving standards. In a study of data from 4,700 registered care locations, involving the UK Home Care Association, home care providers reported “extremely small margins or even losses” once operating costs were taken into account. Short home care visits created inefficiencies and were associated with lower ratings for quality of care, the report said. While the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) had recommended home care visits no shorter than half an hour, this had become the norm rather than the baseline, the company claimed. “Analysis of providers as a whole shows that those that deliver a greater proportion of their overall provision as 60-minute visits are more likely to be rated ‘outstanding’ by the statutory regulator, the Care Quality Commission,” it added.

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  • Dementia UK produces resource on pain and pain management

    Dementia UK produces resource on pain and pain management

    10.07.19 A new information leaflet from Admiral Nurse charity Dementia UK tackles the difficult issue of pain and pain management, on the premise that people with dementia experience pain but may not be able to respond to it in the way that others do. In particular, they may be unable to recognise pain, manage it or communicate about it in the usual ways. Sharron Tolman, consultant Admiral Nurse, said: “There is evidence that people with dementia are more likely to experience untreated pain than those who aren’t living with the condition. There are a number of things you can do at home to help manage pain but identifying it as a concern in the first place is key to developing a good plan of care. Treatments can include warm and cold compresses, relaxation and movement as well as use of medication to maximise comfort.”

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  • Social care should have urgent £8 billion cash boost, Lords argue

    Social care should have urgent £8 billion cash boost, Lords argue

    08.07.19 A cash injection of £8 billion for social care should be given immediately by the government to bring quality and access back up to acceptable levels. That is the view of the House of Lords Economic Affairs Committee, which has published a report calling for free personal care to be introduced over a period of five years and funded by general taxation. Committee chair Lord Forsyth said that social care was severely underfunded and that more than a million adults who needed it were not receiving it. Adding that the care workforce was underpaid and undervalued, he said: “The whole system is riddled with unfairness. Someone with dementia can pay hundreds of thousands of pounds for their care, while someone with cancer receives it for free. Local authorities are increasingly expected to fund social care themselves, despite differences in local care demands and budgets. "

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  • NICE urges care professionals to promote healthier lifestyles

    NICE urges care professionals to promote healthier lifestyles

    09.07.19 Healthier lifestyles for people with dementia have taken another step forward following a dementia update from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), which says that they should be offered activities such as exercise, aromatherapy, art and gardening to promote their wellbeing. The recommendation is made in NICE’s newly updated quality standard on dementia, which says that people living with dementia and their carers should be assisted to choose activities by being able to talk to health care professionals about their life experiences, preferences, interests and strengths. Professor Gillian Leng, NICE deputy chief executive, said: “People with dementia can find it harder to take part in activities, to engage socially, to maintain their independence, to communicate effectively, to feel in control and to care for themselves. Providing enjoyable and health-enhancing activities like music or reminiscence therapy can help with this.”

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  • Councils fail Care Act duty to review dementia packages early

    Councils fail Care Act duty to review dementia packages early

    08.07.19 Less than half of people with dementia are getting the regular reviews of their social care packages to which they are entitled, Healthwatch England has said. In a new report, based on the views of 700 people receiving care and an analysis of data from 97 local authorities, Healthwatch England finds that people often lack a clear understanding of the support available to them and how to access it, wait on average over two months from requesting council support to getting it, and are already at crisis point when they ask for that support. According to the Care Act 2014, councils should review people’s care plans at least once a year but Healthwatch found that this was only happening with 45% of care plans.

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  • E-Newsletter - 5 July 2019

    E-Newsletter - 5 July 2019

    Here is this week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. This week's topics include healthier lifestyles for people with dementia being promoted by NICE and a new resource from Dementia UK on pain and pain management. It is an editor's selection which we hope you will enjoy.

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  • Oral health of residents with dementia neglected

    Oral health of residents with dementia neglected

    04.07.19 Too many care homes are failing to protect and promote the oral health of their residents, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) says in an in-depth review published this week. Despite recent NICE guidance stressing the importance of oral health in care homes, the CQC says, the majority (52%) of the 100 care homes inspected had no policy on good oral health. Nearly half (47%) gave no staff training to support people’s daily oral health care, while homes looking after people with dementia were the most likely to have no plan in place for oral health. Two-thirds of homes said residents could access NHS dental care, but the CQC highlighted the lack of dentists available to visit care homes. Some care home managers said they had to call GPs, NHS 111 or even take residents to A&E in a dental emergency.

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  • Health systems can't afford dementia drugs breakthrough, says Rand

    Health systems can't afford dementia drugs breakthrough, says Rand

    05.07.19 A US think tank has claimed that many European countries, including the UK, are ill-prepared for the considerable cost to health services if a treatment or disease-modifying therapy for dementia is discovered. In a detailed analysis undertaken through the Rand Corporation, reported by the Financial Times (FT), it was found that one million Europeans could be left without access to dementia treatment if a breakthrough occurred. Soeren Mattke, who has overseen two studies on the subject, told the FT that the recent failure of aducanumab as a possible dementia treatment had spared health systems huge pressure. “In essence the big crisis [for preparedness] would have been if aducanumab had worked and would have entered the market next year,” he said.

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  • Majority of MPs say dementia care should be funded by state

    Majority of MPs say dementia care should be funded by state

    04.07.19 The vast majority of MPs think dementia care should be mostly or entirely funded by the state, Alzheimer’s Society claimed this week, as the charity lobbied parliamentarians for a £2.4 billion “Dementia Fund”. As MPs taking part in the dementia care debate in the Commons last week urged the government to boost funding, the Society revealed results from a YouGov survey showing that 77% of MPs believe social care is underfunded. It found that 70% of Conservative MPs and 90% of Labour MPs think state funding should pay for all or most dementia care. Alzheimer’s Society chief executive Jeremy Hughes said “We’re calling for MPs to back our campaign and demand that the government brings forward an urgent plan to fix dementia care.” The £2.4 billion fund is one of the aims of the Society’s Fix Dementia Care campaign.

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