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  • Dementia Research Institute rolls out plans for “life-changing discoveries”

    Dementia Research Institute rolls out plans for “life-changing discoveries”

    26.04.17 The new Dementia Research Institute (DRI), based at University College London (UCL), has announced details of a £55 million research programme spread across six leading universities. Five new DRI centres joining UCL in the research programme have been named as Cambridge, Cardiff and Edinburgh Universities, Imperial College London and King’s College London. It is hoped that the DRI will revive the search for new dementia drugs following a series of recent setbacks and eventually it will have 400 researchers working to achieve the goal. The Medical Research Council said the six centres offered state-of-the-art research and imaging facilities which would be used to expand on the traditional views of neurodegenerative disease in the complex environment of the brain, taking into account interactions with wider physiological processes in the human body that may influence the risk of developing dementia and its rate of progression.

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  • Young Dementia Network launches diagnostic tool for doctors

    Young Dementia Network launches diagnostic tool for doctors

    21.04.17 A pilot GP decision-making tool has been launched by the Young Dementia Network (YDN), which is hosted by the charity YoungDementia UK. YDN has worked closely with GPs to create the tool because accurate and timely diagnosis is essential if people are to live well with young onset dementia. Evidence suggests that it currently takes twice as long for a younger person to receive a dementia diagnosis than for an older person. Feedback is welcomed from people with young onset dementia, their families and professionals. People are urged by the YDN to read about the tool and review it by completing one of the online surveys (one for GPs, another for others), as well as take a copy of the tool to their own GP and tell other health professionals about it while encouraging them to complete the surveys too. Click HERE

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  • E-Newsletter 14 April 2017

    E-Newsletter 14 April 2017

    I am delighted to bring you my week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. In this Weekly Newsletter I am taking some of the best stories from the 24-hour newsfeed and adding some of my own. It is an editor’s selection that I hope you will enjoy.

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  • Stark variations in care homes quality in England

    Stark variations in care homes quality in England

    20.04.17 An analysis of Care Quality Commission (CQC) care home inspections shows stark variations across England. Focusing on the proportion of homes rated “inadequate” or “requires improvement”, the analysis by older people’s charity Independent Age found that London was the best performing region and the north-west was the worst-performing. Best performers were London (20.3% of homes rated inadequate or requires improvement), east of England (20.8%) and the south-west (21.1%). Suggesting reasons for the regional variations, Independent Age policy director Simon Bottery said: “Money is likely to be one cause but not the only one. We believe the drivers for care home quality variation includes factors such as low levels of funding by local authorities, low pay and difficulty recruiting staff, and the lack of a good support mechanism for improving care homes that are struggling.”

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  • Paola Barbarino appointed Alzheimer’s Disease International CEO

    Paola Barbarino appointed Alzheimer’s Disease International CEO

    19.04.17 Paola Barbarino has been appointed chief executive of Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) as the global charity prepares for its annual conference in Kyoto, Japan. Barbarino, who is currently managing director of consultancy company Opaline, starts her new role on May 15 but will attend the Kyoto conference at the end of April. Until last September she ran a London-based membership organisation for Lebanese financiers called LIFE and was previously director of development at the Cass Business School. She takes over from Marc Wortmann, who is leaving after more than 10 years as executive director. "I am delighted to be joining ADI at this key juncture in the organisation's history. I look forward to working with the Board and ADI's membership to achieve our vision of prevention, care and inclusion today, and cure tomorrow," she said.

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  • More money and better planning needed for health and social care, say Lords

    More money and better planning needed for health and social care, say Lords

    14.04.17 A House of Lords committee has recommended far-reaching changes to the NHS and social care to secure the long-term future of the system. It says responsibility for adult social care should be transferred from local authorities to a new government Department of Health and Care. The Lords committee slams the “short-sightedness” of successive governments for failing to plan effectively for the long-term future of health and adult social care and calls for a new, independent Office for Health and Care Sustainability to be established, tasked with regularly reporting to parliament on likely changes in health and care needs 20 years hence.
    The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) welcomed the report, but stopped short of endorsing its call for social care budgets to be transferred to the government. Lords report HERE

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  • “Somewhere in Time” exhibition shares stories of dementia

    “Somewhere in Time” exhibition shares stories of dementia

    14.04.17 An exhibition of intimate photographic portraits of people with dementia and their carers is coming to the Civic art gallery in Barnsley. Taken by local professional photographer Adrian Ashworth, the photographs in the exhibition – called “Somewhere in Time” - are all in black and white, exploring relationships and, in Ashworth’s words, “laying bare the soul” of the person living with dementia and the carer. The trigger for the series was the onset of his own father’s dementia. Ashworth says “It will hopefully raise awareness of what these families so often go through together.” He added: “The images are a way to remind us all how frail our existence is and that, far more importantly than just viewing the images with a thought of who has dementia, we should be seeing that the one thing remaining in all of these people’s lives is love.” The exhibition runs from April 22 to June 3 and admission is free. For more information visit www.barnsleycivic.co.uk

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  • Survey seeks to find out about “green dementia care” activities

    Survey seeks to find out about “green dementia care” activities

    13.04.17 What are the opportunities, barriers and good practice relating to “green” or nature-based care for people with dementia in residential care and extra care settings? The Housing and Dementia Research Consortium and the University of Worcester’s Association for Dementia Studies (ADS) hope to find out in a new pilot study. Indoor and outdoor activities promoting health and wellbeing through interaction with nature all qualify as “green dementia care,” examples including walking outdoors, gardening, exercising outdoors, interacting with and caring for animals (indoors or outdoors), caring for indoor plants, and arts and crafts activities relating to nature or based outdoors. Extra care and residential care managers (or appropriate staff members) are asked to complete the survey by Friday April 21. All responses will be anonymous. Survey info HERE

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  • Review identifies “significant gaps” in support and training for home care staff

    Review identifies “significant gaps” in support and training for home care staff

    12.04.17 “Significant gaps” in home care workers’ support and training to provide care for people with dementia up to the end of life – and the stress and emotional labour of the work – may need to be better acknowledged by policy makers. So says a new literature review from King’s College London and Kingston University. Researchers found evidence that lack of clarity about job role and concerns about pay were leading staff to question the value of their work, while more support was needed to cope with the emotional labour of providing end of life care. They conclude: “Our systematic review revealed a paucity of research exploring the reported experiences and feelings of homecare workers providing care up to end of life for people with dementia. The growth in this area of practice, along with rising demographic and social trends associated with ageing societies, indicates a possible need for more research on experiences, preparation and support needs from their perspectives.”

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  • E-Newsletter 07 April 2017

    E-Newsletter 07 April 2017

    I am delighted to bring you my week’s round-up of dementia care news, stories and comment. In this Weekly Newsletter I am taking some of the best stories from the 24-hour newsfeed and adding some of my own. It is an editor’s selection that I hope you will enjoy.

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